Tag Archives: Mofftiss

Sherlock: His Last (Abominable) Season

Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes looking shocked and horrified with hands covering mouth and nose

Oh, the humanity… Honest, it’s just laying there, a mass of smoking wreckage.”

Some folks have asked if I’m planning to review Season 4 of the BBC’s Sherlock.  the caption above is a quote from the Hindenburg Disaster broadcast. I thought it appropriate…  I’m going to borrow from a comment I just posted on the Timey-Wimey-Wibbly-Wobbly post:

I haven’t seen Season 4. I have not even read any fan reviews, though a friend did tell me she was underwhelmed and confirmed two of my guesses as to what happened in episode 1. I do have a recording of the episode, but I’ve not been inclined to watch it given the condition of the world right now (including the Brexit and U.S. election votes). I suspect this will be the last season until Freeman and Cumberbatch decide they need the money and some suit at BBC wises up. Though by then, there will probably not be a PBS broadcasting in the U.S. any longer and any corporate suit who is looking for a surefire nostalgia success will want to reboot with younger actors.

You’d think Moftiss would realize that what people really want is the Hope that the original Sherlock Holmes stories brought, that smart, good individuals did exist, cared, and could bring about justice for even the poor. We can already see the stupid, cruel, and rich crushing the middle- and poorer-classes while making an obscene gesture to the altruistic and enlightened concepts like “Truth, Justice and the American Way”, as the old Superman TV series put it. Though, in fact, it was also the British Way first.

Yes, I am depressed and despondent over the political and social climate, and the descent of Sherlock into soap opera Shock schlock. In our unenlightened, racing-to-the-Dark-Ages, post-fact, (i.e. stupid and ignorant) society we’ve also devolved into a brutish, cloddish, crude, rude, adolescent male, post-taste culture, if it can be called “culture” except in the social science sense.

As for my review of Season 4, I’ll copy my comment in the You’re Disappointed With Me post on the Season 4 pre-release Christmas episode:

I confess I’m not certain I’m going to bother with my review of “The Abominable Bride” because it was so…abominable. The short review is that Moftiss have made it clear that they are no longer interested in doing what made “A Study in Pink” such phenomenal television and storytelling, capturing the spirit of the original Sherlock Holmes stories while updating them to contemporary mindsets and technologies. This is too bad because the first half presented a lovely re-creation of the Gothic story still in vogue in Victorian England about the time Sherlock Holmes first appeared. Alas, Abominable Bride was a very unfortunate look into the Medieval Gothic minds of Moftiss while using the formula of Dr. Who. As the friend I was watching it with said, “I liked the first half when it was spooky Sherlock Holmes and then it just became this excuse to explain away everything that happened in the first half by making it all a dream, or rather a drug-induced hallucination. All the clever lines and bits were int he first half.”

Which, as some know, is my complaint with Dr. Who where something is set up in the first half and the second half is just emotional manipulation before coming up with a timey-wimey wibbly-wobbly “solution” to the problem (often involving a likable character’s not-real or temporary “death” — and Sherlock has now “died” at least 3 times). My friend later sent me a link to a Tumblr(?) post arguing that the symbolism in Sherlock’s “Mind Palace” sequences explains away everything else, including the sexism inherent in the episode, as being not real and simply representing Sherlock’s own messed up interior perceptions. I replied with a link to a review that stated that the “mansplaining” (a really horrible term for so many reasons) wasn’t the most abominable thing about “The Abominable Bride.”

Both Moffat and Gatiss have stated that they don’t feel that Sherlock is about re-telling the original stories or even solving mysteries, but about the characters, thus freeing them to do whatever they wish. Unfortunately, what they wish is not to tell good, let alone great, stories but to show how clever they are at manipulating plots and pandering to the interest of a small group of people. And by pandering, I’m talking about repeating things that were fresh and popular before, such as Andrew Scott’s Moriarty, the little boy from “Sign of Three”, Janine, the cute-meet of Holmes and the riding crop, the cruel banter relationship between Mycroft and Sherlock, Mrs. Hudson complaining, Molly Hooper, Mary Holmes being smarter than her husband, and so forth. Rather than put their minds to it and work to create something fresh, they simply repeat what was popular before as they do on Dr. Who. (And yet, when they do bother to create something fresh and entertaining on Dr. Who, it becomes a big hit…whereupon it is usually done to death in subsequent episodes… This is called hack writing.)

I didn’t bother to go see “The Abominable Bride” on the big screen and even though I have a DVD with the aired episode, I haven’t watched it again, and doubt I ever will.

Though, if I thought it would help return Sherlock to its original genius, I’d consider donning a tasteless purple Klu Klux Klan outfit and, for no apparent rational reason, meet “secretly” with other fans at an abandoned, de-sanctified church lit by bonfires viewable throughout the countryside in the wee hours chanting nonsense words (rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb). It says something when I found the psychopathic young woman pretending to be an abducted child episode of “Elementary” not only more faithful to the spirit of Sherlock Holmes but more enjoyable (even with the unnecessary Watson soap opera subplot).

Oh, and I used to do reviews back in the 90’s of a couple of other shows in the voice similar to the one used by “Joe Bob Briggs.” Mofftiss should be glad I’m no longer using that voice to show my disdain for condescending to their audiences. 😉

I’m still working my way up to some reviews of the Sherlock Holmes pastiche novels I‘ve been reading, but work and life have been getting in the way. And to be honest, what’s happened with BBC Sherlock, Elementary and the news of a re-boot of the Robert Downey, Jr.-Jude law version (something completely unnecessary except for greed and the short attention span of much of today’s audience), combined with some of the appalling fiction using characters named “sherlock” and “Watson” but bearing no understandable connection to Doyle’s creations, has left me disinclined to spend much effort on the site. Sorry about that. Perhaps I’ll feel better after I get through re-reading the Canon this year.

I do wish you a New Year filled with Peace, Prosperity, Joy, Good Health, Happiness, and some stimulating puzzles to solve.

OOh, Look, Sherlock! Lots of Treats For Fans

Benedict Cumberbatch as BBC Sherlock in black coat for series 3

Where the hell is that bloody cable installer? I’ve got to hook it up to the hard drive and test the video feed before John gets back.

Just a quick post of links to some yummy things to keep us going and as compensation for those of  us who do not live in an area where we can watch the BBC Sherlock Series 3 on New Year’s Day. (After 13 years with no TV reception, I am waiting for the cable installers to arrive and give me Local Basic Cable for obvious reasons. Please, don’t tell them that I’ll be canceling it after February…)

First, if you think we’ve been inundated with Sherlock Holmes recently, you ain’t seen nothin’ yet! A U.S. judge has ruled that most of Sherlock Holmes canon is now in the public domain (not including John Watson’s second wife, however…). The ruling came as the result of a civil action brought by author and editor Leslie Klinger (the New Annotated Sherlock Holmes) and states that elements of the Sherlock Holmes stories written by Doyle prior to 1 January, 1923 are now in the U.S. public domain. There’s a very well-done article in the New York Times here.  

There’s another one that makes a nice distinction between the stories being in the public domain and the characters and story elements being in the public domain at the Wall Street Journal (which makes sense given the financial implications). And if you’ve a legal frame of mind, the blog TechDirt dices the ruling into judicial slices for you. There’s another article at The Hollywood Reporter that also digs into the ruling and its implications for creatives (writers & filmmakers, natch).

The Doyle estate argument definitely was a weak one for the U.S. courts where a fine distinction between “flat entertainment characters” and “complex literary characters” is not likely to be recognized. (I’m writing that with a straight face. No, really, I am… Okay, there was a little sarcasm in my head and there was maybe a little wink-wink-nudge-nudge going on when I typed “recognized.”) While I expect a veritable flood of Biblical proportions of Sherlock Holmes creative (and I use that term in its loosest sense) to deluge my in-box and the internet, it should be noted that an appeal of the ruling is possible (I’d say likely since otherwise the Doyle estate has basically lost all of its U.S. licensing income immediately, as opposed to at least delaying the loss by another couple of years).

But don’t expect to see a flood of BBC Sherlock fan fiction getting published on Amazon any time soon (well, not unless they pull a 50 Shades of Grey and scrub the serial numbers off with different names, et al). BBC and Team Sherlock made it clear when Elementary was being bantered about that they intend to “protect the interest and wellbeing of our offspring.” A reasonably polite way of saying they’ll sue the trousers and pants off anyone who tries to cash in on their work.

Photo Spoiler Alert: Stop Now If You Don’t Want to See ANYTHING from BBC Sherlock Series 3

Second, there’s a lovely bit of fun on PBS to attempt to quell the riots until the 19th January. It’s called Unlocking Sherlock, and if by chance you haven’t seen it, you should. Mark Gatiss has quite a lot of fun chewing up the scenery as he reads excerpts from Arthur Conan Doyle’s original work, and Steven Moffat is rather charmingly mellow and candid as he talks about Sherlock Season 1 & 2, particularly A Scandal in Belgravia (he admits that his Irene Adler is not a nice person and does some incredibly horrible things during the episode — and that Sherlock is chillingly cold-blooded when he saves Mycroft’s bacon and roasts Adler at the end). And then there are all of those behind-the-scenes clips we hadn’t seen before and the bits with Cumberbatch and Freeman (my gosh, Cumberbatch looks so thin in those clips (and pale)! I want to make a giant pot of Tom Kai Gai (Thai chicken soup) and an entire bakery of goodies and go feed him! Eat! Eat!  Take a little nosh, bubeleh! )

There’s a nice interview with Moftiss (Steven Moffat & Mark Gatiss) about Sherlock Series 3 on ScreenRant.

There’s a whole slew of new official pictures from Sherlock Series 3 released. YOu can see the complete gallery on PBS here. But I’ve grabbed a few faves and posted them below just because the boys look so fine. Continue reading

Benedict Cumberbatch Reveals Sherlock Season 3 Secret at Comic-Con

Yeah. Like That’s going to happen. but Team sherlock did release a video of Martin Freeman in Bilbo regalia (and nearly getting blown away in the New Zealand wind) stating that as soon as he finished his filming in New Zealand, he was heading back to London to film Sherlock Season 3 Episode 3, and that meanwhile fans should pummel Team Sherlock (aka Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat aka Moftiss) with rude, pushy questions and rip their clothes off. Meanwhile, Benedict Cumberbatch had fun pretending to be confused as to his purpose and then making a lot of gesticulations and faces explaining how Sherlock survived the Reichenbach Fall (no, really, you have to watch it). The really good news is that Benedict cumberbatch comfirmed that they are back in the UK at the end of July to begin filming Episode 3 of Sherlock. Hurrah! (And London prepare for the fan attack. It’s not really a riot.)

Laterz!

You Could Always Call The Doctor, James

Andrew Scott as James Moriarty in BBC Sherlock looking disgruntled

Maybe I was a little hasty with The Final Solution. Is it too late to change the script so I don’t actually die?

Sorry, but Andrew Scott let it out at the television conference that Moriarty is indeed dead (well, I could have told everyone that) much to the wails of a segment of Sherlock fans. It also came out that the reason Moriarty was included to begin with was that a bit of research by Mofftiss discovered that the one character all of the fans wanted to see in a Sherlock Holmes series was Moriarty. All of this was a surprised to Moffat who pointed out that Moriarty was on only in one story. But look at how many times he appears in the movies and pastiche pieces, Mr. Moffat!

It also came out that the entire bit at the end was added to the revised script because they came up with it for the audition since the only thing planned at that point was the “Gay Jim” bit. After Scott finished chewing the scenery, spitting it out, and flossing his teeth with Semtex, Mofftiss ordered some changes to The Great Game — and then had to work their way out of it.

Frankly, I feel Andrew Scott was the Best Moriarty Ever — and I grew up with all of the classic ones. The problem with the other Moriarties (is that the plural for Moriarty?) is that they were always so stuffy and pompous, which did fit in with the Victorian/Edwardian Canon, but the part missed is that he was a total psychopath. Andrew Scott’s rendition is a fabulous bat-sh** crazy psychopath (sort of the very bizarre offspring of Johnny Depp’s Hunter S. Thomson and Anthony Hopkin’s Hannibal Lecter).

And the amazing thing is that Mr. Scott seems like such a nice guy in the interviews.

 

I’m Sure You Can Crack the Code, Sherlock

Benedict Cumberbatch as BBC Sherlock on a contemplative pose

Rat. Wedding. Bow. A very clever game to keep the fans, and me, from getting bored, Mofftiss, but I’ll figure it out.

Let the games begin! Between flying Sherlock solutions to the Fall and scrambling to re-read all of Sir Arthur Conan Doyles Sherlock Holmes stories again to try and crack the bode, I think we’ll all be a bit busy this fall. Of course, now that Andrew Scott has admitted he knows the Secret of the Fall, he might want to make certain he doesn’t travel alone or at least keeps an eye out for bands of desperate Sherlock fans…

Meanwhile, I’ll get back to the fanfic and a couple of other things I’m working on instead of actual work. *sigh*

Sherlock Season 3 Hints — Spoilers, Sweetie

Well, the Baker Street Babes, among others, have posted the hint that Mark Gatiss and company gave about Season 3 Sherlock. I’m not certain it actually helps reduce the pain (especially since there are awful rumours that the first episode won’t air until FALL 2013).

Follow the link to the Baker Street Babes Tumblr post. Or this one to their true home on Blogger.

There’s also a nice piece on the hints at Radio Times.

The 3 Key Words Given were:

RAT

There are a number of possible stories that could apply. We know that The Empty House has to be a part of the first episode and Moran was certainly a rat, however, there is always the untold case of the Giant Rat of Sumatra and, of course, the reference in The Boscombe Valley Mystery. Chances are good that we’ll get a first episode that makes reference to more than one Holmes story.

WEDDING

Alright, alright. Calm down. I’ve already discussed John Wedding scenario possibilities here. And let’s be honest we’d all LOVE to see Sherlock and Mycroft at a Bachelor Party! But there are a a LOT of weddings in the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Canon including:

  • The Sign of the Four with Mary Morstan (whom even Sherlock finds “charming”)
  • Charles Augustus Milverton (who is certainly another “rat”)
  • The Illustrious Client (although we’ve already used that one once in Scandal, but they didn’t use the bit where Sherlock gets engaged — and then jilts the bride)
  • The Noble Bachelor (which coudl be turned into John and make the fans happy with a runaway bride)
  • The Solitary Cyclist which has lots of heroic action and a plucky, but poor heroine and is bit Victorian for my taste but I know many Sherlockians love it.

And, of course, it could always be a switch-aroo with Mofftiss and Molly could be the one with wedding…
and she asks Sherlock to walk her down the aisle since her dad is dead…hmmm?

BOW

SIIII-LENCE!

(To quote Dumbledore)

Now calm down everyone. We’ll proceed in a calm and orderly fashion. Remember, Keep Calm and Believe in Sherlock Holmes.

Yes, yes, the first thought is His Last Bow where Sherlock retires, but keep in mind a) that there were stories written and published afterwards that took place before Last Bow and b) the word has many meanings in English. It also has multiple pronunciations, although the report is that it was said like the bow of a ship or the bow after a performance. And yes, it’s true, that while Cumberbatch and the rest have said they would love to keep doing Sherlock they are all very hot commodities right now with very lucrative and creatively satisfying offers.

Well, I’m off to do more research in the Canon (and drink some camomile tea to calm down). You do realize that Mofftiss did this to torture us because they are such awful sadists, don’t you?

 

Sorry You Missed the Bachelor Party, Sherlock

Benedict Cumberbatch as BBC Sherlock looking decidedly upset with John Watson off camera

What do you mean you got married?

Let’s face it, Sherlock, you’d make a terrible best man. So John would have to ask Lestrade and then you’d get all pissy and ruin the reception if not the wedding (although it would certainly be fun for all if you were drugged and joined in on Thriller…).

Okay, so I was recently in a brief discussion with someone who was worrying about the fact that Mary Morteson should be turning up soon in the series and that would end up with John Watson getting married and moving out of 221B and I was agreeing it was inevitable when someone else pointed out that *John marries BEFORE The Final Problem* in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Canon *and she dies BEFORE The Empty House.*

I went back and re-re-read the stories and sure enough, John has a very fast courtship and a rather brief marriage and, like a good Victorian wife in so many stories, she dies as soon as she becomes inconvenient. So either Mofftiss and company are dropping Mary entirely from their series or she might be making her entire appearance off-camera in the intervening period before Sherlock returns. Personally, I’d love to see Sherlock’s reaction to John explaining that he’d gotten married.

Of course, the fanfic writers have been having Sherlock hook up with Irene Adler in the intervening period and producing a little Hamish in tow,  so I suppose it’s only fair for John to get some downtime action — and at least he knows to use protection… The really scary fanfic have Moriarty reproducing (usually with Adler).